Australian Museum: Man in lingerie plays with Lego at children’s event | Photos

The Australian Museum has defended allowing a man in women’s underwear to play with Lego alongside children, after a woman called it “disgusting”.

The Australian Museum in Sydney has defended offering a “safe place where everyone feels welcome” after a man in women’s lingerie was photographed playing with Lego with children.

The photos were taken at a “Nights at the Museum” event in April and shared on Twitter earlier this month by a user with the username @SydneyRadfem.

They show a man dressed in black fishnet stockings, pink boots and women’s underwear, sitting with another person in a top hat, playing with Lego blocks surrounded by young children.

“You let a man in fetish gear play in the Lego children’s pit during school breaks,” said the woman said. “When I spoke to security they told me there was nothing they could do and pointed me to the organizer. He’s sitting there with his whole package outside. Disgusting!”

The woman’s account appears to have since been deleted.

One Twitter user wrote: “The man in fetish clothes wants to play with the kids and the museum is too cowardly to get him out. I’m surprised the parents didn’t grab him by the hair and kick him out for next week. He was poking around in the wasp nest.”

Another said: “In the past, I worked at an adventure park, and this Herbert would have been kicked out in double the time.”

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2GB host ben fordham called the Australian Museum at its show on Monday.

“I’m not sure what to make of this, I encourage you to go and take a look [at the photos] – I find it creepy,” he said.

“It shows a group of children building with Lego, and sitting with the children is a man in women’s underwear. The woman who took the photos complained to the staff but she says nothing was done.”

In a statement shared with news.com.au, a spokesperson said the Australian Museum “is committed to being a safe place where everyone feels welcome.”

“The safety of our visitors and staff is our top priority and we have policies, procedures, security and Australian Museum staff in place to ensure this,” he said.

“Images shared by the ‘Sydney Radfem’ Twitter account on Tuesday, May 3, 2022 were taken nearly three weeks earlier, at approximately 8pm, during a Nights at the Museum event held on Thursday, April 14, 2022.

“Several members of our security and programming teams spoke with her that night following concerns she raised about two people wearing costumes.

“Teams investigated and confirmed that the costumed individuals were staying apart and had not interacted with anyone else in the area that was open to all. The Australian Museum teams confirmed this with ‘Sydney Radfem’, who stayed until the end of the evening with her own son.

“Other children in the area were supervised by their own parents and we received no complaints other than the one raised by ‘Sydney Radfem’ that night. The Australian Museum fully addressed ‘Sydney Radfem’s’ complaint on the night of the event.

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“To ensure that all visitors feel comfortable at future Nights at the Museum events, the brick play pit will be designated as a children-only area.”

Fordham criticized the museum’s response.

“I think they might need to think about how this works next time,” he said.

“It’s the school holidays, you have a Lego area and you have a man sitting next to the kids leaving very little to the imagination, if I may put it that way.”

He added: “I don’t know how the museum knows it’s a costume, it could just be his appearance.”

The Australian Museum, located on William Street in the CBD, was founded in 1827, making it the oldest in the country.

The heritage-listed institution specializes in natural history and anthropology.

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